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CLIF Blog

Aug. 15, 2005
Atkins Gone Belly-Up
Low Carb Fever cool-down has been a huge relief! Though some good things came out of the low-carb revolution:


  1. Awareness of overeating carbohydrate foods with few nutrients (like white bread and soda)

  2. Choosing less-processed and more natural foods

  3. Searching out healthier, nutrient-dense carbohydrates (like fruits and whole grains)


But despite the new popularity "good" carbs like whole grain bread, oatmeal, bananas, carrots, long-grain rice, and smaller spaghetti plates, I still hear echoes of low-carb misconceptions among even my most nutrition savvy co-workers, family, and friends.

Comments like the following make me cringe:


"I love corn, even though I shouldn't"

"The only bad thing I do is eat flour"

"Beets are high in sugar so I cut them out of my diet"

"I don't do low carb any more, but I know potatoes are bad so I avoid them"


Is it my ethical obligation as a dietitian to inform them that potatoes, beets, and corn are quite good for you? Do I a break into a long monologue about white flour not being the best source of vitamins, minerals, and fiber but still having its place in healthy eating?

With a twinge of guilt for not correcting common nutrition confusion, I often let these statements go by to avoid a big discussion while enjoying (or trying to enjoy) my own lunch or dinner.

But later, when the opportunity is right, I will slip in my all-foods-in-moderation-philosophy and continue to spread the word that food-inclusion, not food-exclusion, is the best way manage your health.

And tonight, I'm going to eat the corn from my organic veggie box. So there.
Posted by:
Tara, the RD
Category:
Food Matters
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We like getting our heart rates up, taking a big breath of fresh air, savoring delicious food. But we also love telling stories and here's where we type 'em up. (BTW, it works both ways; leave a comment—please and thank you.)

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