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CLIF Blog

Dec. 9, 2005
The Nature of Things
I read a ton of nutrition news and research summaries each day. Here are a few of some of the headlines this week:

Iron and calcium are linked to a higher risk of lung cancer in new research from the Harvard School of Public Health (from MedlinePlus.gov)

University of Florida scientists find sugar may have a sour side—Fructose may trick you into thinking you are hungrier than you should be (from EurekAlert.com)

Study: Wine heart benefit "small" (link from cnn.com)

Red wine improves artery health in heart patients (from NutraIngredients.com)

Who knows what tomorrow's headline holds? Maybe "High Calcium Intake Reduce Obesity Rates" or "High Iron Intake Improves Circulation." It's hard to say, really.

One question I commonly get is, "With new nutrition news coming out each day how do I know what I am supposed to eat?"

A few things come to mind when I hear this question. One is MODERATION, not eating too little of one food (green vegetables, perhaps) and not eating too much (too much green vegetables = gas).

Another thing that comes to mind is going with "The Nature of Things." Last week at our annual day-long company meeting, our fine CEO spoke to the company on this topic. Applying the idea of going with the nature of things makes perfect sense when it comes to nutrition.

Is pumping yourself up with 30 glasses of milk each day because you heard that calcium would help you lose weight seem natural or wise? Thirty glasses of milk would mean forcing it down your throat. 3 or 4 glasses seems more in tune with the nature of things.

Maybe the latest finding is that cinnamon helps manage blood sugar. Adding a tablespoon to your oatmeal isn't natural. Just taste it and you'll know. But adding a teaspoon here and there throughout the week will not do any harm and may add up to some healthy benefits.

Research is ongoing in food and nutrition and scientists are always making incredible new findings. This research often makes its way to headlines without any consideration for whether or not it's time for us to apply it to our everyday actions for healthier living.

So the next time read the headline of some new nutrition discovery, think about "the nature of things" and do what comes naturally. And, keep checking in here for nutrition truths behind the headlines.
Posted by:
Tara, the RD
Category:
Food Matters
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We like getting our heart rates up, taking a big breath of fresh air, savoring delicious food. But we also love telling stories and here's where we type 'em up. (BTW, it works both ways; leave a comment—please and thank you.)

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